THE END

Mark 15:1-15

Jesus Before Pilate

15 Very early in the morning, the chief priests, with the elders, the teachers of the law and the whole Sanhedrin, made their plans. So they bound Jesus, led him away and handed him over to Pilate.

“Are you the king of the Jews?” asked Pilate.

“You have said so,” Jesus replied.

The chief priests accused him of many things. So again Pilate asked him, “Aren’t you going to answer? See how many things they are accusing you of.”

But Jesus still made no reply, and Pilate was amazed.

Now it was the custom at the festival to release a prisoner whom the people requested. A man called Barabbas was in prison with the insurrectionists who had committed murder in the uprising. The crowd came up and asked Pilate to do for them what he usually did.

“Do you want me to release to you the king of the Jews?” asked Pilate, 10 knowing it was out of self-interest that the chief priests had handed Jesus over to him. 11 But the chief priests stirred up the crowd to have Pilate release Barabbas instead.

12 “What shall I do, then, with the one you call the king of the Jews?” Pilate asked them.

13 “Crucify him!” they shouted.

14 “Why? What crime has he committed?” asked Pilate.

But they shouted all the louder, “Crucify him!”

15 Wanting to satisfy the crowd, Pilate released Barabbas to them. He had Jesus flogged, and handed him over to be crucified.

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Mark 15:25-39

25 It was nine in the morning when they crucified him. 26 The written notice of the charge against him read: the king of the jews.

27 They crucified two rebels with him, one on his right and one on his left. [28]  29 Those who passed by hurled insults at him, shaking their heads and saying, “So! You who are going to destroy the temple and build it in three days, 30 come down from the cross and save yourself!” 31 In the same way the chief priests and the teachers of the law mocked him among themselves. “He saved others,” they said, “but he can’t save himself! 32 Let this Messiah, this king of Israel, come down now from the cross, that we may see and believe.” Those crucified with him also heaped insults on him.

The Death of Jesus

33 At noon, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon. 34 And at three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”).

35 When some of those standing near heard this, they said, “Listen, he’s calling Elijah.”

36 Someone ran, filled a sponge with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to take him down,” he said.

37 With a loud cry, Jesus breathed his last.

38 The curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. 39 And when the centurion, who stood there in front of Jesus, saw how he died, he said, “Surely this man was the Son of God!”

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QUESTIONS TO DISCUSS

RETELL

Put the story in your own words.
What stands out? What’s unusual or unclear?

REACT

How do different people react to Jesus?

REVEAL

What is revealed about Jesus in this story?

REASON

Why do you think Mark included this event?

RESPOND

How might you respond to this story?
Are there any practical steps to take?

Glossary

Synagogue / Temple: The Temple in Jerusalem was the centre of ancient Israel’s worship of God. It was the place where God’s presence and rule was most strongly associated with his people, and where the priests modelled relationship with him. As Israelites spread through the surrounding territories they set up ‘synagogues’ to meet together to worship God.

Messiah: Synonym of ‘Christ’. The ‘Messiah’ was a key figure promised in the story of the Bible who would bring God’s plans to save humanity to fulfilment by being a victorious king over God’s people who would reign forever.

Son of God: Another royal term like ‘Messiah’ that comes from a promise to King David that one of his descendants would be called ‘Son’ by God himself. It became a short-hand to speak of the Messiah. The question is, given the interactions between God and Jesus in Mark, is there more to it than that?

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